Counterfeit Gospel #3


I’m about half-way through Trevin Wax’s book, Counterfeit Gospels. I have only one complaint and we’ll see if it survives the rest of the book. So far, it seems repetitive. Perhaps that’s simply because of human nature. Wax lists six counterfeits, but their traits and symptoms overlap quite a bit. Sin is like that though.

Recently, I was challenged to search my heart and ask the Holy Spirit to uncover my “pet sins.” I can list several sins that cling to me, but they all dissolve in the acid of pride.

It was pride that enticed Eve to devour a fruit that would make her “like God.”

It is pride that goads me into an argument with my husband to prove that I’m right.

It’s pride that leads me to over-commit, trying to show off my Superwoman skills.

It’s pride that spearheads envy, pride that fosters worry, pride that keeps me from shouting the true gospel of Jesus Christ from the roof tops.

The third Counterfeit Gospel that Wax describes is the “moralistic gospel.” This one is like the missing security thread on a twenty dollar bill – few people will actually spot it. Perhaps it is more frequently exchanged among “life-long Christians” than among new, excited babes in the faith.

Wax tells a story of a pastor explaining Christ’s miracle of walking on the water and calming the seas. The pastor struggled to convey a deeper meaning: Christ’s ability to calm the storms in our own lives. But his listeners were brand new to the Scriptures and had a language barrier as well. They simply could not get beyond the power of a Man who could walk on water and calm raging seas.

Once, we were astonished at the grace that saved, awed by the supernatural love of a God who would die for us. Over time, we not only begin to practice a doctrine of “gratitude leads to good behavior” but we may even begin to preach this counterfeit gospel.

Beware Christian. Galatians 5:1 could be the theme verse for this chapter.

So Christ has truly set us free. Now make sure that you stay free, and don’t get tied up again in slavery to the law.

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